Posts Tagged afghanistan

SOCOM Wants US Companies To Make Russian Rifles/Machine Guns

From National Interest:

More specifically, USSOCOM wants American companies to explore whether it is feasible to “reverse engineer or reengineer and domestically produce the following foreign-like weapons: 7.62×54R belt fed light machine gun that resembles a PKM (Pulemyot Kalashnikova Modernizirovany), and a 12.7×108mm heavy machine gun that resembles a Russian-designed NSV (Nikitin, Sokolov, Volkov).”

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More Weapons Fall Into Enemy Hands

From KitUp:

Fighters affiliated with the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, or ISIS, have reportedly stolen more U.S. weapons in Afghanistan, according to new images on social media.

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The V-22 Has Proven To Be A Wise Investment

From Business Insider:

The Osprey demonstrated its worth in Afghanistan, one of the most stressing environments on earth. With few airfields, great distances between bases and sparse landing fields, the V-22 proved its versatility and value.

The combination of speed and maneuverability also made the V-22 an ideal platform for special operations missions, combat search and rescue and aeromedical evacuation. Air Force Special Operations Command has found the CV-22 variant particularly useful for deep insertion missions in complex terrain. The Osprey’s speed allows for deep penetration missions under cover of darkness.

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Boy Who Fought Against Taliban Dead at 12

From LA Times:

Wasil was waiting Monday at a fruit stand in Tirin Kot, the capital of southern Afghanistan’s Uruzgan province, when he was shot dead by two gunmen. His uncle said he was 12 years old.

The boy’s death — in a conflict that began before he was born — has made national headlines and served as a grave reminder that children continue to fight and die on all sides of the enduring hostilities in Afghanistan.

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Military Looks The Other Way on Afghan Pedophilia: “It’s their culture”

From The New York Times:

In his last phone call home, Lance Cpl. Gregory Buckley Jr. told his father what was troubling him: From his bunk in southern Afghanistan, he could hear Afghan police officers sexually abusing boys they had brought to the base.

“At night we can hear them screaming, but we’re not allowed to do anything about it,” the Marine’s father, Gregory Buckley Sr., recalled his son telling him before he was shot to death at the base in 2012. He urged his son to tell his superiors. “My son said that his officers told him to look the other way because it’s their culture.”

The policy of instructing soldiers to ignore child sexual abuse by their Afghan allies is coming under new scrutiny, particularly as it emerges that service members like Captain Quinn have faced discipline, even career ruin, for disobeying it.

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Green Beret “Involuntarily Discharged” After Assaulting Afghan Pedophille

From The Daily Mail:

Sergeant 1st Class Charles Martland, 33, was serving in the country’s war-torn Kunduz Province in 2011 when he apparently learned an Afghan police commander he had trained had raped a boy.

He and his team leader, Daniel Quinn, confronted Officer Abdul Rahman – who had also allegedly beaten the 12-year-old’s mother for reporting the sexual assault – and ‘shoved him to the ground’.

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Pararescueman Receives Air Force Cross

From Defense Media Network:

On Dec. 10, 2013, Master Sgt. Ivan M. Ruiz, a Pararescueman, was attached as the lone rescue specialist to an Army Special Forces team assaulting a Taliban stronghold. The team inserted into the Mushan village area in no-visibility conditions due to the CH-47 Chinooks creating a dust and sand cloud at the insertion point. Despite this, Ruiz quickly gathered his element of Afghan commandos and moved rapidly to the objective. While they moved, an orbiting flight of AH-64 Apache helicopters observed armed insurgents maneuvering into attack positions, and began engaging with 30 mm cannon fire.

 

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Strategy in Real Time: Dueling with an Enemy That Moves

Strategy in Real Time: Dueling with an Enemy That Moves is republished with permission of Stratfor.”

By Philip Bobbitt

Strategy is a two-way street. But many commentators act as though formulating a strategy is the same as solving a chess problem. Chess problems are artificially constructed arrangements on a chessboard where the goal is to find a series of moves that leaves the other side no room to evade a checkmate within three or four turns. The sorts of conflicts bedeviling us these days, however, are more like the game of chess itself, in which there is no determinate, continuous series of moves that will guarantee victory every time. Each new contest depends on the actions of the other side, how we react to them, how they respond to our reactions, and so on.

Ignoring this aspect of strategy seems to contribute to the widespread view that victory in warfare amounts to the destruction of the enemy, a facile assumption that is all too unthinkingly held. “Defeating the enemy” may be the definition of victory in football, or even in chess for that matter, but not in warfare. Victory in war is the achievement of the war aim, and if, after Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan, we still think that victory is simply the devastation of our adversaries, we have a lot of reflecting to do. Read the rest of this entry »

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Soldiers Reuniting With Dogs Through Nonprofit

From Wells Fargo:

Turns out, she didn’t have to, thanks to Linda Norwood, a graphic designer with Wells Fargo’s Wealth, Brokerage and Retirement (WBR) team, and The Puppy Rescue Mission ― a Texas-based nonprofit that works to reunite soldiers with the pets they befriend in war zones around the world. Founded in 2010 by a military wife, the organization has since rescued more than 700 animals.

 

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U.S. Born al-Qaeda Member Killed in Pakistan

From CNN:

Pakistan’s army said it killed an al Qaeda operative who grew up in the United States and was on the FBI’s list of most wanted terrorists.

Shukrijumah, a senior commander, is thought to have served as one of the leaders of al Qaeda’s external operations program, according to the FBI, hatching plots to attack the West.

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Was Afghanistan Worth It For Britain?

From BBC:

The great majority of the ordinary Afghans I have spoken to about this over the years have no doubt about it: the British had helped to shore up this country and make it more stable and prosperous.

‘Now,’ said a man I came across in the north of Kabul, ‘the future is very good, with elections and everything. Before there was nothing like this place here, this road.’

 

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3-Star General On His Book “Why We Lost”

From NPR:

“I am a United States Army General, and I lost the Global War on Terrorism.”

Those are the frank opening words of a new book by retired Army Lt. Gen. Daniel Bolger, Why We Lost: A General’s Inside Account of the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars. Bolger continues:

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Taliban Attack Karachi Airport

From The New York Times:

A squad of militant commandos, disguised as government security forces, stormed Karachi’s international airport after dark. They carried food, water and ammunition, apparently in preparation for a long siege, and big ambitions: perhaps to hijack a commercial airliner, government officials said Monday, or to blow up an oil depot, or to destroy airplanes on the tarmac.

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Did We Trade 5 Taliban For A Deserter?

From The New York Post:

One night, after finishing a guard-duty shift, Bowe Bergdahl asked his team leader whether there would be a problem if he left camp with his rifle and night-vision goggles — to which the team leader replied “yes.”

Bergdahl then returned to his bunker, picked up a knife, water, his diary and a camera, and left camp, according to Rolling Stone.

The next morning, he was reported missing, and later that day, a drone and four fighter jets ­began to search for him.

From ABC:

Nathan Bethea, a former soldier who says he served in Bergdahl’s unit, recently wrote that he and his colleagues had been forced to stay quiet about the truth of Bergdahl’s case.

“And that the truth is: Bergdahl was a deserter, and soldiers from his own unit died trying to track him down,” Bethea wrote in The Daily Beast Monday. “Bergdahl was relieved from guard duty, and instead of going to sleep, he fled the outpost on foot. He deserted. I’ve talked to members of Bergdahl’s platoon—including the last Americans to see him before his capture. I’ve reviewed the relevant documents. That’s what happened.”

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Soldier Survives Gun Shot To The Neck

From The Telegraph:

Doctors told Lance Corporal Simon Moloney the odds of the bullet missing his airway and major arteries were “a trillion to one,” but despite bleeding heavily, he returned to his post and carried on firing at insurgents for 90 minutes before being flown to safety.

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