Posts Tagged navy

Navy SEAL Who Shot bin Laden Being Pressured To Not Reveal Himself

The former SEAL is set to do an interview with Fox News on Nov. 11.

From Business Insider:

… in a statement issued to Business Insider the Pentagon stressed that anyone who participated in the 2011 operation that left the Al Qaeda leader dead was “still bound” by a “non-disclosure agreement to not discuss classified information, especially in a nationally televised interview.”

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Threat To Family Members Of Military

From Fox News:

An Army intelligence bulletin is warning U.S. military personnel to be vigilant after Islamic State militants called on supporters to scour social media for addresses of their family members – and to “show up [at their homes] and slaughter them.”

The assessment, obtained by Fox News, came from the Army Threat Integration Center which issues early warnings of criminal and terrorist threats to Army posts worldwide.

 

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Unmanned Naval Fighter Operates With Manned Aircraft

From Defense Media Network:

The Navy’s unmanned X-47B returned to carrier operations aboard RooseveltAug. 17, with the X-47B team focused on perfecting deck operations and performing maneuvers with manned aircraft in the flight pattern.

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A-4 Skyhawk Anniversary

From Defense Media Network:

Tinkertoy, Scooter, Bantam Bomber, Mighty Midget, Mighty Mite, Heinemann’s Hot Rod, and other affectionate names were given to the A-4 Skyhawk, which first flew on June 22, 1954, and in fact the Douglas Aircraft Company’s Edward H. Heinemann had the design so right that Skyhawks are still in service today.

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“The F-35 Is A Turkey” Says Designer Of The F-15

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Joint Aircraft Are A Bad Idea

From RAND:

In short, we find no evidence that historical joint aircraft programs have saved money. We also find that joint aircraft programs have obliged the services to accept unwelcome design compromises, have contributed to the shrinking of the military aircraft industrial base, and might have heightened the strategic and operational risks for the services and their pilots. Consequently, unless the participating services have identical and stable requirements, the Defense Department should avoid taking a joint approach to acquiring future fighter and other complex aircraft.

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The Iranian Navy: A Symbolic Show of Force in the Atlantic

The Iranian Navy: A Symbolic Show of Force in the Atlantic is republished with permission of Stratfor.”

Summary

Tehran announced Feb. 8 that it had dispatched a frigate and a supply ship to the North Atlantic Ocean, where they will approach U.S. maritime borders. This is not the first time the Iranians have announced their intent to deploy naval vessels close to the United States. Iran made two such declarations in 2011 but never followed through.

However, following the most recent announcement, Iranian Adm. Afshin Rezayee Haddad said the Iranian fleet is actually underway, already approaching the South Atlantic Ocean through waters off the coast of South Africa. The Iranian decision to deploy naval vessels to the North Atlantic is largely symbolic; it does not pose any real military risk. Iran will use the deployment to show the flag in a non-threatening manner, looking to appease its hard-liners who are dubious about the U.S.-Iran nuclear talks. Read the rest of this entry »

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New Navy Missile Launcher

From Wired.com:

In a recent round of tests announced Tuesday, Chemring Countermeasures and Raytheon Missile Systems say they have successfully fired a Raytheon-Lockheed Martin Javelin missile from a prototype multi-role Centurion launcher during testing at the Defence Training Estate on Salisbury Plain in England, where it was able to hit a static target.

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Pictures of Newest Carrier USS Gerald R. Ford

It is still incomplete but when finished will be the first in a new class of carrier.

From MilitaryTimes.com:

Officially under construction since November 2009, the work to build the 1,092-fo0t-long ship has actually been going on for more than a decade.  Hiding under scaffolding, covered in anti-rust primer, the Ford has just received a new coat of paint, part of the preparations for her public debut on Nov. 9, when ship’s sponsor Susan Ford Bales, daughter of the 38th U.S. president, will formally christen the ship.

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Update: Navy Can Wear First Navy Jack

From Military Times:

“As of September 2013, all Naval Special Warfare personnel are authorized to wear the U.S. flag and the “Don’t Tread on me” uniform patches,” Navy spokeswoman Lt. Cmdr. Sarah Flaherty told Navy Times. “In the past, NSW did not authorize wearing either patch unless one was deployed or in a work-up cycle. However, NSW recently sought special permission from the Chief of Naval Operations staff to wear the patches within the continental United States.”

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Obama Bans First Navy Jack From Navy Uniforms

From The Daily Caller:

The email, dated October 22, reads:

ALL:

WARCOM and GROUP TWO/ONE have pushed out the uniform policy for NWU III and any patches worn on the sleeve.

All personnel are only authorized to wear the matching “AOR” American Flag patch on the right shoulder.  You are no longer authorized to wear the “Don’t Tread On Me” patch.

Again the only patch authorized for wear is the American flag on the right shoulder. Please pass the word to all

Thanks

Senior Enlisted Advisor

[Name Redacted]

I think it is obvious that because the First Navy Jack has the phrase “Don’t Tread On Me” which is used by those politically opposed to the administration, the administration has decided to ban the First Navy Jack from uniforms. Never mind the fact that as of Sept. 11, 2002 all Navy ships are to fly the First Navy Jack. Where is the directive to reverse that decision? And what about soldiers, seamen or marines who have the phrase tattooed on their body?

First Navy Jack:

Gadsden Flag:

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F-35B Begins Ship Trials

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First Drone Carrier Landing

From Military Times:

If all goes as planned, a successful landing of the X-47B experimental aircraft will mean the Navy can move forward with its plans to develop another unmanned aircraft that will join the fleet alongside traditional airplanes to provide around-the-clock surveillance while also possessing a strike capability. The aircraft’s success would pave the way for the U.S. to launch unmanned aircraft without the need to obtain permission from other countries to use their bases.

Update (16:51):

First Carrier Arrested Landing:

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Profile of a Navy SEAL and His Dog

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LPD-17 San Antonio Class

From Defense Industry Daily:

LPD-17 San Antonio class amphibious assault support vessels are just entering service with the US Navy, and 11 ships of this class are eventually slated to replace up to 41 previous ships. Much like their smaller predecessors, their mission is to embark, transport, land, and support elements of a US Marine Corps Landing Force. The difference is found in these ships’ size, their cost, and the capabilities and technologies used to perform those missions. Among other additions, this new ship is designed to operate the Marines’ new MV-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft, alongside the standard well decks for hovercraft and amphibious armored personnel carriers.

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