Posts Tagged navy

First Female Blue Angel Pilot In Charge Of Fat Albert

From Marine Corps News:

Marine Capt Katie Higgins, the newest pilot of “Fat Albert,” a C-130 Hercules flown by the Blue Angels, has become the first woman in history to perform with the squadron.

“I am so glad I get to be a part of the 130 team members who are the best in their field,” said Higgins, a Severna Park, Md., native. “I came to the Blue Angels because I wanted to be a part of the elite team dedicated to precision and expertise. I didn’t come out here thinking I was going to be breaking barriers; I simply wanted to do my job to the best of my abilities.”

, , , , , ,

No Comments

Pentagon Resurrects Vietnam Era Aircraft In Fight Against ISIS

From The Daily Beast:

Thirty years after Vietnam, the Pentagon again found itself fighting elusive insurgents in Afghanistan, Iraq and other war zones. It again turned to the OV-10 for help. In 2011, Central Command and Special Operations Command borrowed two former Marine Corps Broncos—from NASA or the State Department, apparently—and fitted them with new radios and weapons.

The OV-10s’ deployment is one of the latest examples of a remarkable phenomenon. The United States—and, to a lesser extent, Russia—has seized the opportunity afforded it by the aerial free-for-all over Iraq and Syria and other war zones to conduct live combat trials with new and upgraded warplanes, testing out the aircraft in potentially deadly conditions before committing to expensive manufacturing programs.

, , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

SEALs Lack Enough Rifles To Go Around

From GOPUSA:

Navy SEAL teams don’t have enough combat rifles to go around, even as these highly trained forces are relied on more than ever to carry out counterterrorism operations and other secretive missions, according to SEALs who have confided in Rep. Duncan Hunter, R-Calif.

After SEALs return from a deployment, their rifles are given to other commandos who are shipping out, said Hunter, a former Marine who served three combat tours in Iraq and Afghanistan. This weapons carousel undercuts the “train like you fight” ethos of the U.S. special operations forces, they said.

, , , ,

No Comments

The V-22 Has Proven To Be A Wise Investment

From Business Insider:

The Osprey demonstrated its worth in Afghanistan, one of the most stressing environments on earth. With few airfields, great distances between bases and sparse landing fields, the V-22 proved its versatility and value.

The combination of speed and maneuverability also made the V-22 an ideal platform for special operations missions, combat search and rescue and aeromedical evacuation. Air Force Special Operations Command has found the CV-22 variant particularly useful for deep insertion missions in complex terrain. The Osprey’s speed allows for deep penetration missions under cover of darkness.

, , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

F-18 Pilots Experiencing Problems

From Defense Media Network:

“Since 2009, the Department of the Navy has noticed a rise in hazard reports, known as HAZREPS, regarding physiological episodes in the Navy’s F/A-18 and EA-18G fleets,” Turner said.

“We’ve been informed that the Navy has organized a Physiological Episode Team,to investigate and determine the causes of these physiological episodes in aviators.  As symptoms related to depressurization, tissue hypoxia and contaminant intoxication overlap, discerning a root cause is a complex process.

, , , , , , , ,

No Comments

Navy Intelligence Admiral Doesn’t Have Security Clearance, Still Has Job

From The Washington Post:

Vice Adm. Ted “Twig” Branch has been barred from reading, seeing or hearing classified information since November 2013, when the Navy learned from the Justice Department that his name had surfaced in a giant corruption investigation involving a foreign defense contractor and scores of Navy personnel.

Some critics have questioned how smart it is for the Navy to retain an intelligence chief with such limitations, for so long, especially at a time when the Pentagon is confronted by crises in the Middle East, the South China Sea, the Korean Peninsula and other hotspots.

, , , , ,

No Comments

Raytheon To Build Phalanx Gun

From Raytheon:

At sea, the Phalanx® Close-In Weapon System—a rapid-fire, computer-controlled, radar-guided gun system—is designed to defeat anti-ship missiles and other close-in air and surface threats. The Land-based Phalanx Weapon System is part of the U.S. Army’s Counter Rocket, Artillery and Mortar systems used to detect and destroy incoming rounds in the air before they hit their ground targets. It also helps provide early warning of attacks.

 

, , , ,

No Comments

Navy Fearing Hacks, Is Returning To Celestial Navigation

From The Telegraph:

…now the US navy is reinstating classes on celestial navigation for all new recruits, teaching the use of sextants – instruments made of mirrors used to calculate angles and plot directions – because of rising concerns that computers used to chart courses could be hacked or malfunction.

“We went away from celestial navigation because computers are great,” said Lt. Cmdr. Ryan Rogers, the deputy chairman of the naval academy’s Department of Seamanship and Navigation. “The problem is there’s no backup.”

, , , , , ,

No Comments

Military Won’t Charge Navy Officer Who Returned Fire In Chattanooga

From Military.com:

Lt. Cmdr. Tim White, the Navy officer who fired a sidearm in defense during the attack on Navy Operational Support Center in Chattanooga, Tenn., will not face charges, an official familiar with the investigation told Stars and Stripes on Wednesday.

, , , , , ,

No Comments

Two Service Members Engaged Chatanooga Shooter

From Navy Times:

A report distributed among senior Navy leaders during the shooting’s aftermath said Lt. Cmdr. Timothy White, the support center’s commanding officer, used his personal firearm to engage Abdulazeez, Navy Times confirmed with four separate sources. A Navy official also confirmed a Washington Post report indicating one of the slain Marines may have been carrying a 9mm Glock and possibly returned fire on the gunman.

, , , , , ,

No Comments

Navy Retires EA-6B Prowler

From Defense Media Network:

The Prowler flew its last deployment with the “Garudas” of VAQ-134 aboard USSGeorge H.W. Bush (CVN 77) in November 2014. It is being replaced by the EA-18G Growler, more often called the Grizzly in order not to be confused with the EA-6B during flight operations. While the Navy is retiring the Prowler, plans are for it to remain in service with the Marine Corps until at least 2019.

, , , , ,

No Comments

Russia Fortifying Arctic Border

From Business Insider:

In order to capitalize on a changing Arctic, Russia is undertaking a major military upgrade of its northern coast and outlying Arctic archipelagos. These bases — which include search-and-rescue stations, military ports and airstrips, and military headquarters — are positioning Russia to become the dominant power in the region.

The Northern Fleet itself is due for a massive upgrade starting in 2015 that will last through the rest of the decade. The fleet has been upgraded to a unit called the Russian Joint Strategic Command North (JSCN), which, according to the Polish Institute of International Affairs, won’t be an ordinary naval force.

, , , , , ,

No Comments

Guantanamo Bay’s Place in U.S. Strategy in the Caribbean

Guantanamo Bay’s Place in U.S. Strategy in the Caribbean is republished with permission of Stratfor.”

By Sim Tack

Last week, the Cuban government declared that for the United States and Cuba to normalize relations, the United States would have to return the territory occupied by a U.S. naval base at Guantanamo Bay. Washington clearly responded that returning the base is not on the table right now. This response makes sense, since quite a bit of politicking goes into the status of the base. However, the Guantanamo Bay issue highlights a notable aspect to the U.S.-Cuban negotiations — one that is rooted in the history of the U.S. ascension to superpower status as it challenged European powers in the Western Hemisphere.

U.S. Expansion in the Western Hemisphere

Cuba, the largest island in the Caribbean, has a prominent position at the mouth of the Gulf of Mexico, separating access to the gulf into two choke points: the Yucatan Channel and the Straits of Florida. It is also situated on the sea-lanes between the U.S. East Coast and the Panama Canal, the shortest route for naval traffic between the two coasts of the United States. Cuba thus has been pivotal to the U.S. strategy to safeguard economic activity in the Gulf of Mexico and naval transport routes beyond that. The evolution of U.S. naval capabilities, however, has changed the part that Cuba, and thus the base at Guantanamo, has played. Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , ,

No Comments

F-35 Makes First Carrier Landing

From DefenceIQ:

The arrested landing is part of initial at-sea Developmental Testing I (DT-I) for the F-35C, which commenced Nov. 3 and is expected to last two weeks.

The tests will measure aircraft’s integration to flight deck operations and will help further define the F-35C’s operating parameters aboard the aircraft carrier.

F-35 landing

, , , , , ,

No Comments

Navy SEAL Who Shot bin Laden Being Pressured To Not Reveal Himself

The former SEAL is set to do an interview with Fox News on Nov. 11.

From Business Insider:

… in a statement issued to Business Insider the Pentagon stressed that anyone who participated in the 2011 operation that left the Al Qaeda leader dead was “still bound” by a “non-disclosure agreement to not discuss classified information, especially in a nationally televised interview.”

, , , , , , , , ,

No Comments