Posts Tagged protests

Journalist Assaulted At Anti-Trump Protest

From The Daily Mirror:

A photojournalist who spent years covering conflicts in the Middle East was brutally attacked while covering an anti-Trump protest in Oakland, California.

Kyle Ludowitz was left with a fractured cheekbone and abrasions when four men attacked him on Wednesday night as he took photos of protesters wreaking havoc across the city.

The 27-year-old was hospitalized and had both his cameras, which were worth $5,000, destroyed in the violent attack.

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Muslim Protesters Should Go Live In A Muslim Country

Franklin Graham said that Muslims protesting the showing of American Sniper should go live in a Muslim country.

Can you believe that the University of Maryland canceled a screening of the movie American Sniper after Muslim students complained? This afternoon, I’m going to meet with wounded military veterans and their spouses who served this nation with honor–fighting to preserve our freedoms and many times shedding their own blood. Chris Kyle was an American hero. It’s brave soldiers like these that make all of the freedoms we enjoy possible. Shame on the University of Maryland for listening to these voices! If these Muslim students can’t support the military members who do their job to protect us, let them leave America and go to a Muslim country. God bless America and our heroes! SHARE this if you agree.

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Primer for Protesters and “Anti-Government Extremists”

From EFF:

Cell Phone Guide For US Protesters, Updated 2014 Edition

With major protests in the news again, we decided it’s time to update our cell phone guide for protestors. A lot has changed since we last published this report in 2011, for better and for worse. On the one hand, we’ve learned more about the massive volume of law enforcement requests for cell phone—ranging from location information to actual content—and widespread use of dedicated cell phone surveillance technologies. On the other hand, strong Supreme Court opinions have eliminated any ambiguity about the unconstitutionality of warrantless searches of phones incident to arrest, and a growing national consensus says location data, too, is private.

Protesters want to be able to communicate, to document the protests, and to share photos and video with the world. So they’ll be carrying phones, and they’ll face a complex set of considerations about the privacy of the data those phones hold. We hope this guide can help answer some questions about how to best protect that data, and what rights protesters have in the face of police demands. Read the rest of this entry »

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An Armed Populace Is The Best Defense Of Government Repression

From Reason.com:

A 2008 study by The Independent Institute’s David Kopel looked at 59 countries, and “the data show[ed]… nations with the highest rates of gun ownership tend to have greater political and civil freedom, greater economic freedom and prosperity, and much less corruption than other nation.”

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Ending The Violence In Ukraine

From US News:

Of immediate concern is preventing the fighting from escalating still further into a bloody civil war. The risk of a broader conflict would increase significantly if Yanukovych feels compelled to call in the army in a desperate last-ditch attempt to restore order. However, such a course is fraught with serious risks, especially if some army units refuse an order to fire on their fellow citizens.

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Raw Intelligence Report: A View from Syria

This report is published with the permission of Stratfor.

Editor’s Note: What follows is raw insight from a STRATFOR source in Syria. The following does not reflect STRATFOR’s view, but provides a perspective on the situation in Syria.

People are scared. An understatement, no doubt, but my friends — both foreign and Syrian — are worried about the developments. Almost all of my foreign friends are leaving and many have moved departing flights up in light of the recent events. Most Syrians don’t have this option and are weighing their options should sustained protests move to inner Damascus. Everyone is thinking along their sect even if they aren’t open about it. Much of the violence is attributed by Syrians to these mysterious “armed gangs.” Many are still placing hope in “Habibna” (literally “Our Love,” a nickname for the president) to bring about enough reforms to placate the demonstrators. A point that I was forced to make over and over is that a lot of the people protesting are doing so because someone they knew was killed and not because they were anti-government, although they are now. Privately, my Syrian friends admitted that Bashar [al Assad, the Syrian president] needs to make some major, major concessions quickly or risk continued protests and bloodshed of which would be attributed to him and not merely “the regime.”

By now we are all familiar with the cycle of protests reaching their high point on Fridays, after prayers. This Friday, however, was different for Syrians. Having seen the infamous emergency law lifted, albeit with serious caveats, Syrians were hoping for a relaxing of the security responses to the demonstrations. What they got was half as many demonstrators killed in one day as in all the days of demonstrations preceding it combined. It was almost as if things had been safer when the emergency law had been in effect. (On a side note, my friend guessed that maybe two out of every 100 Syrians could actually tell you what the emergency law was.) What was most striking about the demonstrations was that there were two in Damascus itself (Midan on Friday, April 22, and Berze on Saturday, April 23). While not in the city center these are by no means the far suburbs and countryside of Daraa or Douma. There were also protests in Muadamiyeh, which is right outside town next to the main bus station. I’ve heard that tanks along this road were seen April 24 pointing their guns not in the direction of the road but toward the city. The regime and everyone is terrified about protests in the city itself. Read the rest of this entry »

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“Hey, Ayatollah, leave those kids alone!”

A Toronto-based rock band is garnering worldwide attention after remaking Pink Floyd’s “The Wall,” into a new anthem — “Hey, Ayatollah, leave those kids alone!” — as a sign of solidarity with Iranians fighting against Tehran’s regime.

Blurred Vision, formed in 2007 by brothers Sepp, 28, and Sohl, 35, who fled Iran with their family in 1986, was inspired to cover the classic tune after watching protests in Iran unfold over the controversial reelection of Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.

“We did a show in Toronto in September and while we were performing we decided let’s play ‘Another Brick in the Wall’ just for the hell of it and as the chorus line came up I just decided to sing ‘hey Ayatollah’ instead of ‘hey teacher’ and when I sang that line the crowd went insane,” Sepp told FoxNews.com.”

http://www.nowpublic.com/world/blurred-vision-sees-straighter-ayatollah

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Proposed Muslim Centre near 9/11 Site Protested in NYC

“Is it disrespectful to the citizens of New York City to build a Muslim centre?  Atlas Shrugged blogger & “birther”  Pamela Geller doesn’t want a proposed centre/mosque built near Ground Zero, but Mayor Michael Bloomberg does.”

http://www.nowpublic.com/world/proposed-muslim-centre-near-9-11-site-protested-nyc-video

Does it really matter whether you call it a community centre or a mosque? Sure it does. A community center sounds so…nice…and innocent.

But first, forgive me for this little detour: yeah, it looks like many Americans do object to a proposed centre/mosque built near Ground Zero – does the fact that some of those objecting are “birthers” make their objections to this “community center” any less valid? And will politicians hear those concerns or dismiss them as the ranting of “birthers”?

Tip: if you want to minimize the impact of a group that disagrees with you, come up with a name to mock them and do everything you can to ridicule them. This way you won’t have to actually answer any questions.

(And no, I’m not going to waste your time discussing the “birther” issue, it doesn’t even matter which side of that little shouting match I lean towards. Mostly I’m just getting tired of the name calling. I was tired of it in first grade, and it’s especially tiring when adults use that juvenile tactic rather than making a case for their opposing view.)

Now back to my initial comment:

How stupid do they think we are?

Oh, Gee, Golly, isn’t it Swell that this nice Egyptian Guy is getting into “community development” and helping our city? He’s not trying to Islamicize anybody. Gosh, no – he’s a “community developer”. Maybe he’ll help us fundamentally change America.

Tip: if you want to minimize the impact of a group that disagrees with you, come up with a name to mock them and do everything you can to ridicule them. This way you won’t have to actually answer any questions.

And, regarding the “community center”:

“Look, we’re building this big, beautiful statue of a horse. Go ahead, drag it inside your city. It’s a monument. See? We really can get along. You’re big and strong, relax, you don’t need to worry – why would you think you need to worry about a statue of a horse? Look at it, what a beautiful monument…”

BTW: you’re not paranoid if someone really is out to get you.

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