Posts Tagged range

Responsible Range Owners

From NSSF:

Understanding the needs of your firing range and how to effectively plan a lead reclamation and maintenance schedule is very important, but those needs and plans will differ between indoor and outdoor ranges. We’ve talked before about reclaiming lead from indoor ranges, so for this column I spoke with Jim Uhlinger, Senior Range Engineer with MT2 firing range services, to discuss some of the common questions surrounding lead reclaimed/recovered from outdoor ranges, both rifle and pistol ranges and shotgun ranges offering clay target sports.

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Precision Rifle and Spotting Scopes

From Gun Noob:

A spotting scope allows you to easily examine your target from the comfort of your own shooting stand. It has advantages over using your rifle’s scope in that it gives you a bigger and clearer picture of your target. It also, by the nature of its optics, powers through the mirage effect so you can see your target better on hot days and over longer distances. Ultimately, the purpose of a spotting scope is to allow you to evaluate your shooting easier than with the scope on your rifle which is meant solely for targeting. While a rifle scope can be used in a pinch, practice on a range isn’t one of those “in a pinch” times. If you’re not using a spotting scope, you’re making things harder for yourself.

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Closing The Generational Gap

From American Handgunner:

We had a great time! They were smart and eager to learn, but their only “training” had come from — choke, gag — TV, movies and the internet. We went over safety, basic marksmanship, cleaning and maintenance, ammo tips, lots of fun shooting and just getting to know them. Now, not everyone who looks like them is like them, but if you see illustrated kids at a range, chances are good they resemble this bunch.

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“Hot” Weapons on the Range

From USA Carry:

I know that some would say (and have) that training a client to shoot and move with a loaded firearm is unsafe. Yet I would argue that not training a client to shoot and move safely with a loaded firearm does more harm than it does good, as doing so only transfers the training risk from the relative safety of the range to the much more hazardous real world environment where the safety net is not present. In the end, I would say that training and learning to safely move with a loaded firearm is safer than not training to safely move with a loaded firearm.

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Range Safety From The National Shooting Sports Foundation

From the NSSF YouTube Channel:

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