Posts Tagged world war 2

A Remembrance For Veterans Day

From IJR:

My grandfather, a World War II veteran, died of cancer when I was 15 years old. He hadn’t talked much about the war — when asked, he always repeated the same two stories: one about eating canned spaghetti for Christmas dinner and the other about a kind Belgian woman who had let him pass a cold night in her basement, despite knowing she could be killed for helping an American soldier.

But PopPop, as we called him, never told us a lot of things — and in the months and years after his death, a picture began to take shape.

, , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

Smooth Mosin Bolt

From IV8888:

, , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

New Jersey Confiscates WWII M1 Carbine

From NJ.com:

 A Cumberland County man cannot keep his grandfather’s World War II rifle because it is an illegal assault firearm, according to a Sept. 15 New Jersey Superior Court Appellate Division decision.

The M1 carbine could not be returned to him because it falls under the definition of an assault firearm, which is illegal to possess according to New Jersey law.

In a motion filed by Burt, he told the court that he acquired the rifle in 2006 from his grandfather, who served in World War II.

, , , , , , ,

No Comments

World War II and the Origins of American Unease

World War II and the Origins of American Unease is republished with permission of Stratfor.”

By George Friedman

We are at the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe. That victory did not usher in an era of universal peace. Rather, it introduced a new constellation of powers and a complex balance among them. Europe’s great powers and empires declined, and the United States and the Soviet Union replaced them, performing an old dance to new musical instruments. Technology, geopolitics’ companion, evolved dramatically as nuclear weapons, satellites and the microchip — among myriad wonders and horrors — changed not only the rules of war but also the circumstances under which war was possible. But one thing remained constant: Geopolitics, technology and war remained inseparable comrades.

It is easy to say what World War II did not change, but what it did change is also important. The first thing that leaps to mind is the manner in which World War II began for the three great powers: the United States, the Soviet Union and the United Kingdom. For all three, the war started with a shock that redefined their view of the world. For the United States, it was the shock of Pearl Harbor. For the Soviet Union, it was the shock of the German invasion in June 1941. For the United Kingdom — and this was not really at the beginning of the war — it was shock at the speed with which France collapsed. Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , , ,

No Comments

Coming to Terms With the American Empire

Coming to Terms With the American Empire is republished with permission of Stratfor.”

By George Friedman

“Empire” is a dirty word. Considering the behavior of many empires, that is not unreasonable. But empire is also simply a description of a condition, many times unplanned and rarely intended. It is a condition that arises from a massive imbalance of power. Indeed, the empires created on purpose, such as Napoleonic France and Nazi Germany, have rarely lasted. Most empires do not plan to become one. They become one and then realize what they are. Sometimes they do not realize what they are for a long time, and that failure to see reality can have massive consequences.

World War II and the Birth of an Empire

The United States became an empire in 1945. It is true that in the Spanish-American War, the United States intentionally took control of the Philippines and Cuba. It is also true that it began thinking of itself as an empire, but it really was not. Cuba and the Philippines were the fantasy of empire, and this illusion dissolved during World War I, the subsequent period of isolationism and the Great Depression.

The genuine American empire that emerged thereafter was a byproduct of other events. There was no great conspiracy. In some ways, the circumstances of its creation made it more powerful. The dynamic of World War II led to the collapse of the European Peninsula and its occupation by the Soviets and the Americans. The same dynamic led to the occupation of Japan and its direct governance by the United States as a de facto colony, with Gen. Douglas MacArthur as viceroy.

The United States found itself with an extraordinary empire, which it also intended to abandon. This was a genuine wish and not mere propaganda. First, the United States was the first anti-imperial project in modernity. It opposed empire in principle. More important, this empire was a drain on American resources and not a source of wealth. World War II had shattered both Japan and Western Europe. The United States gained little or no economic advantage in holding on to these countries. Finally, the United States ended World War II largely untouched by war and as perhaps one of the few countries that profited from it. The money was to be made in the United States, not in the empire. The troops and the generals wanted to go home. Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , ,

No Comments

Woman Was Oldest Female Vet at 108

From Stars and Stripes:

The nation’s oldest woman veteran, Lucy Coffey, died Thursday in San Antonio. She was 108.

A small-town girl from a farm in Martinsville, Indiana, Coffey had a sense of adventure. She left the farm for Chicago, then moved to Dallas, where she was working at an A&P supermarket on Dec. 7, 1941 — the day Japan bombed Pearl Harbor.

 

, , , , , , ,

No Comments

The Difference Between Free Men and Slaves

Janusz Korwin-Mikke

, , , , , , ,

No Comments

108 Year Old WWII Vet Lives On His Terms

From Townhall.com:

Richard Overton is a 108-year-old World War II veteran who served at Pearl Harbor, and fought in both Okinawa and Iwo Jima. But, let’s just pretend that wasn’t enough to make you forget your admiration of some reality-TV pop star… He also smokes 12 cigars a day, loves guns, and drinks whiskey with his coffee every morning.

, , , ,

No Comments

MKS Supply Making New M1 Carbines

For immediate release:

MKS Supply Brings Back the M1 Carbine!

 

Almost too cool to be true

 

 Dayton, OH, October 2014–MKS Supply, LLC announces that production of the original Inland brand M1 Carbine is again underway and the iconic .30 caliber, World War II-era M1 Carbine will be marketed exclusively by MKS Supply, LLC.

These newly manufactured M1 Carbines are 100 percent American-made with 100 percent American parts. These are faithful copies of the original Inland Manufacturing carbines, right down to part construction and stampings. They even include the arsenal-stamped stock markings known as cartouches!

In fact, these carbines are so precisely copied from the original specifications that the company marks the underside of the barrel and the inside of the stock of these current models to prevent potential fraudsters from passing these new carbines as mint WWII originals, or using these new-production parts to “upgrade” original models (these markings are not visible unless the action is removed from the stock).

Three Inland M1 Carbine models are just now available:

M1 1944 Wood stocked original design without bayonet lug……….MSRP $1049.00

M1 1945 wood stocked original (above) design with bayonet lug…MSRP $1049.00

M1A1Paratrooper. Original design folding heavy wire stock……….MSRP $1179.00

  • All carbines include an original-looking cloth sling and oiler.
  • The 1945 and Paratrooper models come with one 15-round magazine.
  • The original 1944 Model did not have a bayonet lug, so MKS chose the new Inland 1944 model to come with a 10-round magazine in order to comply with the law in states that limit magazine capacity to ten rounds and prohibit the sale of firearms with bayonet lugs (to prevent millions of “drive-by bayonetings” we assume).

One magazine is included with each carbine. Extra 15- and 30-round magazines are not available with this offering, but all models will accept original and correct replica 15-and 30-round magazines. All models feature the same original-type adjustable 1944-era “peep” battle sights.

 

A total of 150,000 Paratrooper models were produced in WWII by all manufacturers. The Inland M1A1 Paratrooper is modeled after the late-1944 production model, which had a low wood walnut forend, Type II barrel band, folding wire stock, and no bayonet lug.

The M1 Carbine is a great little firearm. It has cool, classic looks, is fun to shoot and packs a low-recoil even as the 110-grain .30 caliber bullet is pushed at nearly 2,000 FPS.

 

Quick history:

Of the 6,232,100 M1Carbines produced overall, almost half were produced by the Inland Division of General Motors between 1941 and 1945. During that time, Inland produced three basic models: The 1944 model without a bayonet lug; the 1945 model with a bayonet lug (probably at the urging of the troops); and a wire stock Paratrooper model that also had no bayonet lug. Also produced by various manufacturers were an additional 570,000 select-fire M2 Carbines and 2,100 M3 Carbines (with flash hider and without sights to allow space for the addition of an infrared sniper scope).

 

The long-lived M1 Carbine was used into the early 1960s by U.S Special Forces advisers in Vietnam and by indigenous troops throughout the war due to its compact size and light weight (5lbs, 3oz). It is still used around the world by various military and police units.

 

Exclusively Marketed by

MKS Supply, LLC

8611-A North Dixie Drive

Dayton, OH, 45414

937-454-0363

www.mkssupply.com

Media Professionals Only:

For more information or images please contact

Shults Media Relations, LLC at

Greatstuff@acsol.net

, , , , ,

No Comments

PPSh

From FPSRussia:

, ,

No Comments

Vet Ditched Nursing Home To Attend D-Day Ceremony

From Daily News:

Bernard Jordan, the 89-year-old World War II veteran who sneaked out of his British nursing home to attend France’s D-Day commemoration, is back in the UK.

Jordan — who served in the Royal Navy and later became the mayor of Hove — said he’d do it all again.

, ,

No Comments

Member Of Merrill’s Marauders Dies At 100

From Military Times.com:

“ ‘Ranger’ ” Roy Matsumoto passed away peacefully in his sleep at his home on San Juan Island, Wash., surrounded by his loving family on the morning of April 21st, 2014,” Karen Matsumoto wrote in an obituary for her father. “He was less than 2 weeks short of his 101st birthday.”

, , , ,

No Comments

75mm Pak 40

, , , , ,

No Comments

WWII Vet Shoots With US Army Snipers

, , , , ,

No Comments

B-17 with MIA Found in Mediterranean

From Battleland:

Navy divers assigned to Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit 2, Company 4, and the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command, stand Oct. 19 with the American flag, and the POW/MIA flag, on the wreckage of a B-17 bomber that was shot down and sank during World War II. The team is deployed alongside JPAC aboard the USNS Grapple (T-ARS 53) as part of a 30-day underwater recovery mission for an unaccounted-for service member who went missing during the crash into the Mediterranean Sea.

, , , , , ,

No Comments