Posts Tagged kidnapping

Former FBI Agent Kidnapped

From The Telegraph:

An expert on Russian organised crime, Mr Levinson, who would now be 64, retired from the FBI in 1998 and became a private investigator. He was investigating cigarette smuggling in early 2007, and his family has said that took him to the Iranian island of Kish, where he was last seen.

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The Case of 20 Missing Mexican Tourists Doesn’t Add Up

“It’s one of the more puzzling episodes in a drug war heaped with unsolved cases: 20 Mexican men travel to Acapulco together and are kidnapped en masse as soon as they arrive.

Two weeks later, there has been no trace of the men. Investigators have yet to announce any good leads, even though two others from the group were not taken.

Against the backdrop of Mexico’s extraordinary drug violence, it’s tempting to write off the Sept. 30 disappearance as another grim skirmish between rival traffickers. Group kidnappings have been a common feature of the feuding, though generally with fewer victims.”

http://www.borderlandbeat.com/2010/10/case-of-20-missing-mexican-tourists.html

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Expert: Mexico’s Kidnapping Industry Extremely Lucrative – not Likely to End

“Kidnapping, one of the crimes that concerns Mexicans the most, is such a lucrative industry for criminals and police that there is little likelihood of seeing it reduced, journalist and writer Humberto Padgett says in his new book “Jauria.”

“Everybody makes money, except the family that sees its daily life fatally interrupted,” the journalist, who spent two years investigating kidnappers and police, as well as speaking with victims, said.

Nearly three kidnappings per day, according to official figures, are committed in Mexico.

A total of 1,181 kidnapping cases were reported last year, up 40 percent from 2008 and nearly double the level in 2006.”

http://www.borderlandbeat.com/2010/10/expert-mexicos-kidnapping-industry-so.html

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Angry Citizens Kill Kidnappers, Force Policemen Out: The Lessons of Ascencion, Chihuahua

“In Ascencion, Chihuahua, a small farming and ranching town of about 10,000 on the road to Casas Grandes, townspeople beat to death two teenage boys participating in a kidnapping of a seventeen year old girl.

Read the rest of this entry »

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A Botched Hostage Rescue in the Philippines

A Botched Hostage Rescue in the Philippines is republished with permission of STRATFOR.

By Scott Stewart

On Aug. 23, Rolando Mendoza, a former senior police inspector with the Manila police department, boarded a tourist bus in downtown Manila and took control of the vehicle, holding the 25 occupants (tourists from Hong Kong and their Philippine guides) hostage. Mendoza, who was dressed in his police inspector’s uniform, was armed with an M16-type rifle and at least one handgun.

According to the police, Mendoza had been discharged from the department after being charged with extortion. Mendoza claimed the charges were fabricated and had fought a protracted administrative and legal battle in his effort to be reinstated. Apparently, Mendoza’s frustration over this process led to his plan to take the hostages. The fact that Mendoza entertained hope of regaining his police job by breaking the law and taking hostages speaks volumes about his mental state at the time of the incident.

After several hours of negotiation failed to convince Mendoza to surrender, communications broke down, Mendoza began to shoot hostages and police launched a clumsy and prolonged tactical operation to storm the bus. The operation lasted for more than an hour and left Mendoza and eight of the tourists dead at the end of a very public and protracted case of violence stemming from a workplace grievance.

Hostage-rescue operations are some of the most difficult and demanding tactical operations for police and military. To be successful, they require a great deal of training and planning and must be carefully executed. Because of this, hostage-rescue teams are among the most elite police and military units in the world. Since these teams are always training and learning, they pay close attention to operations like the one in Manila and study these operations carefully. They seek to adopt and incorporate tactics and techniques that work and learn from any mistakes that were made so they can avoid repeating them. Even in highly successful operations, there are always areas that can be improved upon and lessons that can be learned.

Indeed, in the Manila case, the events that unfolded provided a litany of lessons for hostage-rescue teams. The case will almost certainly be used in law enforcement and military classrooms across the globe for years as a textbook example of what not to do. Read the rest of this entry »

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Police Confirm Mexican Mayor Is Missing

Mayor Edelmiro Cavazos Leal

The mayor of the northern Mexican city of Santiago is missing and was apparently kidnapped by gunmen working for an organized crime group, police said Monday.

http://www.borderlandbeat.com/

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A Look at Kidnapping through the Lens of Protective Intelligence

This report is republished with permission of STRATFOR

By Scott Stewart

Looking at the world from a protective-intelligence perspective, the theme for the past week has not been improvised explosive devices or potential mass-casualty attacks. While there have been suicide bombings in Afghanistan, alleged threats to the World Cup and seemingly endless post-mortem discussions of the failed May 1 Times Square attack, one recurring and under-reported theme in a number of regions around the world has been kidnapping.

For example, in Heidenheim, Germany, Maria Boegerl, the wife of German banker Thomas Boegerl, was reportedly kidnapped from her home May 12. The kidnappers issued a ransom demand to the family and an amount was agreed upon. Mr. Boegerl placed the ransom payment at the arranged location, but the kidnappers never picked up the money (perhaps suspecting or detecting police involvement). The family has lost contact with the kidnappers, and fear for Mrs. Boegerl’s fate has caused German authorities to launch a massive search operation, which has included hundreds of searchers along with dogs, helicopters and divers. Read the rest of this entry »

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