Posts Tagged security

How To Control A Physical Altercation

From The Armory Life:

In any violent physical altercation, there are four critical factors that can determine your victory or failure. What are they and how can they give you a tactical advantage should you need them?

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Lockdown Has Changed Minds On Guns

From The Washington Free Beacon:

Scott Kane went 38 years without ever touching a gun. That streak would have continued had it not been for the coronavirus. In March, fearful of the harassment his wife and child experienced over their Asian ancestry, Kane found himself in a California gun shop. His March 11 purchase of a 9mm would have been the end of the story, were it not for a political standoff over shutdown orders and background checks. Now Kane, a former supporter of gun-control measures and AR-15 bans, is frustrated by the arduous process that has denied his family a sense of security. The pandemic has made the soft-spoken software engineer an unlikely Second Amendment supporter.

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Why Are Military Personnel Disarmed On Base?

From Ammoland:

“Action” that needs to be taken is to implement an audacious new policy where all military officers and S/NCOs are to be continuously armed with issue M17/18 pistols at all times, on and off base.
That is the only way we can adequately protect our military members from terrorists, something at which we’re obviously failing miserably now.

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Couple Thinks Walmart Is Responsible For Their Security

From AP:

A Texas couple who were injured in a mass shooting at a Walmart store in El Paso last month recently filed a lawsuit against the corporation alleging it did not have adequate security in place to prevent the attack that killed 22 people.

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The Reason For An Armed Citizenry

From Bearing Arms:

The Second Amendment was created with one purpose in mind, and – let’s be honest here – that purpose wasn’t hunting or even self-defense from criminals. While our Founding Fathers supported the right to have arms for those purposes, the primary motivation for the Second Amendment was to protect this country.
That thinking played into the potentially apocryphal comment made by Japanese Admiral Yamamoto, who argued that invading the United States would be a disaster because “there would be a rifle behind every blade of grass.” I say it’s potentially apocryphal because no one has been able to confirm that the admiral actually said this, but it’s the kind of valid observation of America that Yamamoto was known to make.

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Lawmakers Give Teachers Choice To Be Armed

From WANE News:

The state representative from Seymour said his bill would not require teachers to take handgun training but would allow the school district to tap into state money to pay for that training.

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Former CBS Reporter Sues Govt For Hacking Her Computer

From Real Clear Politics:

A federal appeals court recently heard oral arguments in my lawsuit against former Attorney General Eric Holder, unnamed “John Doe” federal agents at the FBI and Justice Department, and others. At issue are the intrusions into my computers while I worked as an investigative reporter for CBS News, revealed by multiple forensic investigations showing use of proprietary government surveillance programs. 

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Australia Wants Backdoors In Software

From Signal:

One of the myriad ways that the “Assistance and Access” bill is particularly terrible lies in its potential to isolate Australians from the services that they depend on and use every day. Over time, users may find that a growing number of apps no longer behave as expected. New apps might never launch in Australia at all.

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QT Hiring Armed Employees

From Guns.com:

The QuikTrip Corporation, with some 750 locations in a dozen states, is advertising for full-time store clerks in the Tulsa area who double as armed security. In short, besides an ability to “provide quality customer service,” among the primary role of the $35 per hour job is to protect the location and those in it. The chain has reportedly trialed the concept in Wichita, Kansas and it has already seen success.

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Gun Free Zones

From Bearing Arms:

A former Delta Air Lines baggage handler was sentenced Thursday to 30 months in prison for allegedly smuggling guns onto passenger planes at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport.

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Angry FBI Agents Likely Source Of Leaked Emails

From Fox News:

“There are probably 100 FBI agents who worked on the investigation of Mrs. Clinton– hardworking men and women in field who gathered evidence and interviewed witnesses–…and are furious at the decision not to prosecute her,” Napolitano said on The Kelly File.

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Choosing A Strong Password Is Easier Than You Think

From EFF:

Randomly-generated passphrases offer a major security upgrade over user-chosen passwords. Estimating the difficulty of guessing or cracking a human-chosen password is very difficult. It was the primary topic of my own PhD thesis and remains an active area of research. (One of many difficulties when people choose passwords themselves is that people aren’t very good at making random, unpredictable choices.)

Measuring the security of a randomly-generated passphrase is easy. The most common approach to randomly-generated passphrases (immortalized by XKCD) is to simply choose several words from a list of words, at random. The more words you choose, or the longer the list, the harder it is to crack. Looking at it mathematically, for k words chosen from a list of length n, there are kn possible passphrases of this type. It will take an adversary about kn/2 guesses on average to crack this passphrase. This leaves a big question, though: where do we get a list of words suitable for passphrases, and how do we choose the length of that list?

In general choosing four five-letter words is better than one long word with number substitutions and some weird characters thrown in. It’s easier to remember and vastly harder for a computer to guess.

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UK Cops Fear Prosecution If They Carry And Use Firearms

From GOP USA:

Police chiefs are struggling to recruit enough officers willing to carry a gun to tackle a Paris-style terror attack, because they fear they will be treated as criminal suspects if they use their weapon in the line of duty, the country’s top firearms officer has warned.

After November’s terrorist gun and bomb attacks on Paris, senior security officials believe Britain needs an extra 1,500 armed officers. But because half won’t make it through rigorous training and selection, police chiefs need 3,000 volunteers to come forward.

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How Did The FBI Break Into iPhone?

From the EFF:

In addition, this new method of accessing the phone raises questions about the government’s apparent use of security vulnerabilities in iOS and whether it will inform Apple about these vulnerabilities. As a panel of experts hand-picked by the White House recognized, any decision to withhold a security vulnerability for intelligence or law enforcement purposes leaves ordinary users at risk from malicious third parties who also may use the vulnerability. Thanks to a lawsuit by EFF, the government has released its official policy for determining when to disclose security vulnerabilities, the Vulnerabilities Equities Process (VEP).

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The European Union Is Not a Security Union

The European Union Is Not a Security Union is republished with permission of Stratfor.”

Summary

In the wake of any shocking event, national governments and officials of the European Union invariably call for more cooperation between member states to prevent anything similar happening in the future. The response to the March 22 terrorist attacks in Brussels has been no different.

Following the attacks, the governments of Germany, Italy, France and members of the European Commission demanded a global response to the terrorist threat. The commission’s president, Jean-Claude Juncker, even proposed the creation of a “security union” to combat terrorism at the continental level. In a March 24 meeting, ministers at the EU Justice and Home Affairs Council highlighted the need to share information among member states to fight terrorism. But despite the calls for greater cooperation among EU members, the national interests of individual member states will prevail in the long run, limiting the possibility of integration within the bloc on security issues. Read the rest of this entry »

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