Posts Tagged county government

Gun Rights Movement Continues Undeterred

From The Washington Examiner:

Rather than an attack on democracy, sanctuary counties are a proper exercise of local democracy. The populations of 86 of Virginia’s 95 counties are in an uproar over the gun control bills, with some members of law enforcement promising to deputize citizens to circumvent the gun control measures. (This will only be effective, however, if the gun control laws have built-in exemptions for law enforcement.)

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Sheriff May Deputize Thousands Of Citizens

From DC Dirty Laundry:

“If the legislature decides to restrict certain weapons [in a way] I feel harms our community, I will swear in thousands of auxiliary deputies in Culpeper,” Jenkins said. “There’s no limit to the number of people I can swear in.” The sheriff added, “Personally, I don’t think some of the bills that are proposed will pass, I don’t think we’re that far left in Virginia.”
Jenkins is serving his third term in the elected office. According to the Culpeper Star-Exponent, he would not refuse to enforce laws he disagreed with but instead would work around them through a process of deputization.

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TX County Becomes Gun Sanctuary

From Texas Scorecard:

Citizens filled the Presidio County courthouse on Wednesday, where—after hearing testimony supporting a proposed gun rights resolution—the commissioners court voted unanimously to declare the county a gun rights sanctuary.

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8 Oregon Counties Pass Sanctuary Gun Laws

From The Washington Examiner:

The Oregonian/OregonLive reported Wednesday that the ordinances say that residents of those counties now have the right to own semi-automatic weapons and high-capacity magazines, regardless of state or federal law.

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Sanctuary Counties For Gun Rights

From KTVZ Oregon:

A measure challenging gun regulations is popping up around the state. Since 2015, four counties have passed a measure known as the Second Amendment Preservation ordinance, and commissioners in Malheur, Union and Lake counties have heard the same measure in the past few weeks.

The ordinance is a reaction to the Oregon Firearms Safety Act, passed by the state Legislature in 2015, which requires background checks for transfers of firearms between private parties. These county ordinances allow sheriffs to ignore this law – which gun advocates see as unconstitutional.

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