Posts Tagged waco

Oppose ATF Nominee At All Costs

From Bearing Arms:

Chipman is squarely in the “ban and arrest our way to safety” camp, as evidenced by comments he made in an “Ask Me Anything” thread on Reddit last year. Chipman was up front about the fact that he believes it should be a crime for anyone to sell a gun without going through a commercial firearms dealer, arguing that even opening up the NICS system to allow private sellers access isn’t enough.

In that same Reddit threat, Chipman also said that he believes that, of all the current gun laws out there, one that needs greater enforcement is against those who “carry a gun illegally.” While many folks may nod their head in agreement, as reporters like Emily Bazelon of Slate have pointed out, places with the type of restrictive carry laws that Chipman embraces are arresting and convicting a disproportionate number of young black men for the non-violent, possessory offense. As Bazelon wrote in 2019:

, , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

ATF/FBI Still Have Questions To Answer About Waco

From The Hill:

Twenty-five years ago today, FBI tanks smashed into the ramshackle home of the Branch Davidians outside Waco, Texas. After the FBI collapsed much of the building atop the residents, a fire erupted and 76 corpses were dug out of the rubble. Unfortunately, the American political system and media have never faced the lessons from that tragic 1993 day.

, , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

Malcolm Gladwell on the Tragedy of The Branch Davidians

From The New Yorker:

Outside the Mount Carmel complex, the F.B.I. assembled what has been called probably the largest military force ever gathered against a civilian suspect in American history: ten Bradley tanks, two Abrams tanks, four combat-engineering vehicles, six hundred and sixty-eight agents in addition to six U.S. Customs officers, fifteen U.S. Army personnel, thirteen members of the Texas National Guard, thirty-one Texas Rangers, a hundred and thirty-one officers from the Texas Department of Public Safety, seventeen from the McLennan County sheriff’s office, and eighteen Waco police, for a total of eight hundred and ninety-nine people. Their task, as they saw it, was to peel away the pretense—Koresh’s posturing, his lies, his grandiosity—and compel him to take specific steps toward a resolution.

Here is Gladwell discussing his piece and what got him interested in what happened in Waco:

, , , , , , , ,

No Comments