Posts Tagged machine gun

Challenge To New Machine Gun Manufacturing

From Cato Institute:

Several years ago, Nick Bronsozian was charged with possession of an unregistered machinegun under a tax law statute. The provision in question, 26 U.S.C. § 5861(d), says that in order to have a machinegun registered, a tax must be paid on it. Simple enough, right? Bronsozian didn’t pay his tax. Case closed. That’s what the government argued anyway, but the situation is more complicated than that.
A subsequently enacted law, 18 U.S.C. § 922(o), prevents the government from registering and accepting tax payments on new machineguns. So Bronsozian was charged and convicted of a felony for not paying a tax that the government would not allow him to pay. If that strikes you as odd, it’s probably because you’ve read the Constitution.

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Bump Stock Ban Now In Effect

From Guns.com:

As gun rights groups and Second Amendment advocates sought a nationwide injunction against the move with the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday, the pending rule change by government regulators to reclassify bump stocks as “machine guns” was set to become effective on March 26. In response, RW Arms, the leading retailer of the devices, announced they would seek to turn in their remaining inventory of bump stocks to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

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Bump Stocks Classified As Machine Guns

Everyone who has a bump stock has 90 days to turn them in or become a felon.

From Breitbart:

The Department of Justice is amending the regulations of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF) to clarify that bump-stock-type devices-meaning “bump fire” stocks, slide-fire devices, and devices with certain similar characteristics-are “machineguns” as defined by the National Firearms Act of 1934 and the Gun Control Act of 1968 because such devices allow a shooter of a semiautomatic firearm to initiate a continuous firing cycle with a single pull of the trigger.

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The Threat Of A Bump Stock Ban

From The Truth About Guns:

I really don’t care much about bump stocks. Well actually, I do and here’s why.

What I really care about is the protection of constitutional liberty and the ownership of personal property. Bump stocks are just the item du jour being targeted. As many of our readers know; I own one as a range toy. For me I don’t need any reason to own a bump stock other than than it brings a smile to my face when I use it.

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Germany’s New .308 Machine Gun

From Small Arms Defense Journal:

The genesis of the resulting HK121/MG5 from the native firm Heckler & Koch came with the German Bundeswehr’s (Armed Forces) “Infantry Soldier of the Future” program, a comprehensive modernization effort concurrent with similar initiatives in the U.S. and other NATO partners.

Striding past another FN design, the commonly fielded MINIMI which is best known as the M249 in U.S. service, HK‘s innovative 5.56mm gun won the competition for Germany’s SAW (squad automatic weapon) role, designated MG4 in logical nomenclature progression. Fielded in 2004 and soon in vicious firefights in Afghanistan, the MG4’s reported reliability, accuracy, soldier-friendliness, and modular adaptability provided additional validation. But with two notable exceptions:

More powerful 7.62 x 51mm NATO ammo was needed for the longer range engagements that characterized the fight against Taliban insurgents.

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PKM Machine Gun

Military Arms Channel takes a look at the PKM:

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