Posts Tagged scotus

Bruen Could Be The Beginning of Striking Down Gun Laws

From The Truth About Guns:

In winning this case in front of SCOTUS, “may issue” laws — laws under which states and municipalities have entirely subjective rules under which they may or may not issue concealed carry permits — have been deemed unconstitutional. This opens up the door for going after unfair, subjective, and otherwise not equally-applied gun control laws all across the country.

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Gun Banners Want Power

From The Federalist:

Why do Democrats despise the Second Amendment so much that they want to effectively banish a branch of the government over it? Because it strips them of their ability to control everything and accumulate power.

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The Bruen Decision Was Just The Beginning

From The Truth About Guns:

There are no longer tiered levels of examination or scrutiny. If the law in question materially limits the right to keep and bear arms, then, with remarkably few exceptions, under Bruen the law will be an infringement on Second Amendment rights.

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Will Supreme Court Take “Assault Weapon” Case?

From Cam and Company:

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CDC Director Disputes Sotomayor’s Covid Claims

From NTD:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Director Rochelle Walenksy disputed Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor’s claim that 100,000 children are hospitalized or seriously ill with COVID-19 during arguments last week.

During an interview with “Fox News Sunday,” Walensky confirmed there are about 3,500 children in the hospital and who tested positive for COVID-19, the disease caused by the CCP (Chinese Communist Party) virus.

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Restitution Should Be A Remedy For Unconstitutional Prosecutions

From The Truth About Guns:

An individual should not be punished for noncompliance with an unconstitutional law. If they were unjustly punished, then they deserve restitution. So far, only a few people have applied for restitution in DC. There is a larger class action lawsuit that needs to be filed against the district.

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Interview with Sharone Mitchell Jr. of the Cook County Public Defenders on NY Gun Case

From Slate’s What Next podcast:

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Gun Rights Groups File Amicus Briefs In NY Carry Case

From Ammoland:

Two national gun rights organizations—the Second Amendment Foundation and its grassroots sibling, the Citizens Committee for the Right to Keep and Bear Arms—have filed separate amicus briefs to the U.S. Supreme Court in support of a challenge of New York State’s ultra-restrictive carry laws by the New York State Rifle & Pistol Association (NYSRPA)

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Reciprocity Now

From The Federalist:

While predicting Supreme Court decisions can be a fool’s errand, given the Supreme Court’s precedents it would appear likely the days of New York and a minority of states requiring citizens to prove “good cause” or a “need” to exercise their Second Amendment right to carry a firearm on their person for self-protection are numbered. Should the Supreme Court strike down these “may issue” requirements, then all states will be “shall issue.”

That’s where the Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act (H.R. 38/S. 1522), introduced by U.S. Rep. Richard Hudson, R-N.C., in the House of Representatives and by Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, in the U.S. Senate makes all the sense in the world. If all states are required to adhere to a “shall issue” policy, it only makes sense to treat concealed carry permits the same way individuals states treat driver’s licenses.

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SCOTUS Case More Than About Right To Carry

From Cam and Company:

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Review Of Stephen Halbrook’s New Book On The Right To Bear Arms

From Reason:

The U.S. Supreme Court has granted certiorari to hear a major case on the right to bear arms, New York State Rifle & Pistol Association Inc. v. Corlett. By happy coincidence, the best book on the legal history of the right has just been published: Stephen P. Halbrook, The Right to Bear Arms: A Constitutional Right of the People or a Privilege of the Ruling Class? Post Hill Press, 371 pages, $17.99, paperback.

Halbrook’s book will be central to the Supreme Court case, just as Halbrook’s previous work was for the Supreme Court’s decisions in District of Columbia v. Heller and McDonald v. Chicago—not only in direct citations, but also in the many original sources that Halbrook was the first to write about, and which the Court incorporated in its opinions.

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