Posts Tagged racism

Rewriting The Second Amendment Continues

From The Federalist:

Just like every other aspect of the American Founding, the ratification of the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution is rooted in nothing more than white supremacy. Or at least, that’s what scholar Carol Anderson wants you to believe.

In her latest book, “The Second: Race and Guns in a Fatally Unequal America,” Anderson argues that the “well regulated Militia” inscribed in the Second Amendment was created to provide states with a mechanism to quell potential slave uprisings.

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MTV: Gun Control Is Racist

From MTV:

States passed laws forbidding African-Americans from carrying weapons. In South Carolina, slaves — who were “of barbarous, wild savage natures” according to Colony Law — could not have unsupervised access to weapons and could be killed freely, provided the murder wasn’t “wanton.” In Florida, white “citizens patrols” were permitted to search the homes of free African-Americans for guns “and other offensive or improper weapons, and may lawfully seize and take away such arms, weapons, and ammunition.” The message was clear: guns — like the ballot box, marriage, and the right to free assembly — were for white Americans only.

Many resisted, and did so with the very weapons they were forbidden to own. Harriet Tubman rescued more than 300 people from slavery with a gun under her arm. Frederick Douglass wrote in 1854 that a good revolver was critical to staying free: “Every slave hunter who meets a bloody death in his infernal business is an argument in favor of the manhood of our race.”

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Increase In Attacks On Asian Americans

From Bearing Arms:

Amidst a rise in attacks on Asian-Americans in cities like San Francisco and Oakland, a growing number of members of the community are choosing to protect themselves and others with a firearm. In a lengthy account, the Washington Post details how the attacks are impacting Asian-Americans and prompting them to think carefully about how best to stay safe while the violence continues to grow.

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Killer Mike On Blacks Embracing Self Defense

From Colorlines:

In fact, following Arbery’s death, I issued a statement urging Black people and people of color to take seriously their Second Amendment rights. I was urging people who look like me to take seriously shooting, training, and the protection of our rights. I put this statement out because the police cannot always get to you on time, and the world is not a just place. I also released these remarks because we cannot assume that everyone who wears a police uniform is just and fair. The high number of people killed by police (1,099 people were killed by police in 2019) proves my point.

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The Racism Of Gun Control

From Daily Caller:

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Ayan Hirsi Ali On America

From Gatestone Institute:

“When I hear it said that the U.S. is defined above all by racism, when I see books such as Robin DiAngelo’s ‘White Fragility’ top the bestseller list, when I read of educators and journalists being fired for daring to question the orthodoxies of Black Lives Matter—then I feel obliged to speak up… America looks different if you grew up, as I did, in Africa and the Middle East”.

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Racist Gun Control Continues

From Page Two:

As Wells had pointed out, in 1892, armed black men in Jacksonville, Florida thwarted a lynch mob that was attempting to break into a prison in order to murder a black prisoner. In the next legislative session, the Florida legislature enacted a new gun control law. It required a license to carry or possess ‘‘a pistol, Winchester rifle or other repeating rifle.’’

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Racism And Gun Control

From The Epoch Times:

How do you stop a lynch mob? With a Winchester repeating rifle. That was the advice of Ida B. Wells, the great journalist who led the fight against lynching. To frustrate her work, a new form of gun control was introduced.

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Fireside Chat From Dennis Prager

From PragerU:

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Gun Control’s Racist Roots

From The Hill:

One month after the Confederate surrender in 1865, Frederick Douglass urged federal action to stop state and local infringement of the right to arms. Until this was accomplished, Douglass argued, “the work of the abolitionists is not finished.”

Kansas Senator Samuel Pomeroy extolled the three “indispensable” “safeguards of liberty under our form of government,” the sanctity of the home, the right to vote, and “the right to bear arms.” So “if the cabin door of the freedman is broken open and the intruder enter…then should a well-loaded musket be in the hand of the occupant to send the polluted wretch to another world.”

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Sheriff David Clarke: Gun Control Was A Tool Of Racists

From PJ Media:

“The fight by the abolitionists, post-slavery, for blacks to be able to be armed — do you know that gun control, early gun control, was really about keeping guns out of the hands of black people? We as black people have been so separated from our history it’s astounding to me. We should be some of the most ardent supporters of the Second Amendment because our history was not being able to possess arms to be able to defend ourselves from mobs, kidnappings and lynchings,” he said during a Heritage Foundation event, “The Right to Arms and the War on Guns.”

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Woman Shoots At Burglars, Kills One

From The Federalist:

Thirty-six-year-old Chen Fengzhu is the latest Internet sensation in China, except she doesn’t live in China. She is a seafood restaurant owner who lives in Gwinnet County, Georgia. Surveillance video the Gwinnet County police department recently released showed that around 4 a.m. on September 16, three burglars armed with guns broke into a house Chen shared with a shop assistant. The robbers were so cocky that they didn’t bother to cover their faces.

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Black Panthers and the Origins of Gun Control

From The Root:

On May 7, 1967, the Black Panthers showed up on the steps of the California Capitol in Sacramento brandishing loaded rifles and black berets in a show of defiance that would forever brand them as enemies of the establishment. They were there to protest the passage of the Mulford Act (nicknamed the “Black Panther Bill” by the press), which had been fast-tracked through the Legislature and signed by then-Gov. Reagan. The bill reversed an existing California law that made it legal to carry a loaded firearm in public as long as it was not concealed or brandished in a threatening manner. Reagan himself was quoted as saying that he saw “no reason why, on the street today, a citizen should be carrying loaded weapons.”

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Gun Restrictions and Racism

From the New York Times:

Until around 1970, the aims of America’s firearms restrictionists and the aims of America’s racists were practically inextricable. In both the colonial and immediate post-Revolutionary periods, the first laws regulating gun ownership were aimed squarely at blacks and Native Americans. In both the Massachusetts and Plymouth colonies, it was illegal for the colonists to sell guns to natives, while Virginia and Tennessee banned gun ownership by free blacks.

Yet African-American activists typically refrain from involvement in the issue of gun rights. In October 2013, Shaneen Allen, 27, a black single mother of two, was arrested in New Jersey for carrying a firearm without a license (she was under the impression that her Pennsylvania concealed-carry permit was accepted across state lines), and threatened with a prison sentence of up to 11 years for her mistake.

But it was conservative publications, such as my own National Review, and the N.R.A. that came to her defense. The N.A.A.C.P. and the usual champions remained unusually quiet. (There was no news conference featuring the Rev. Al Sharpton.) They have been largely absent, too, from the case of Marissa Alexander, a black Florida woman given a 20-year sentence for firing a warning shot near her abusive husband.

 

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Book – This Nonviolent Stuff’ll Get You Killed: How Guns Made the Civil Rights Movement Possible

You can read a review of the book at PJ Media and pre-order it at Amazon.com.

Cobb’s book is both a history of the civil rights movement and a memoir of his involvement. Cobb was a field secretary for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), one of the front-line civil rights organizations in the 1960s South. As the name suggests, SNCC — like many of the civil rights organizations — eventually adopted Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s belief in peaceful non-resistance. But as Cobb’s book explains, even Dr. King was not initially prepared to turn the other cheek.

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