Posts Tagged riots

Denver Law Criminalizes Everyday Objects, Not Just Homemade Guns

From Bearing Arms:

“The pieces of the legislation that weren’t talked about were the pieces about reorganizing the code, the weapons code…basically criminalizing youth a little bit more.” CdeBaca said. “I think this emerged from the protests. People had umbrellas or they had their airsoft guns or they had other things to protect themselves from the pepper spray that was being deployed by the police officers, and now that bill made all of that a crime.”

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The Atlantic Thinks Gun Sales Caused Crime, Not The Other Way Around

From The Atlantic:

After murders in the United States soared to more than 21,000 in 2020, researchers began searching for a definitive explanation why. Many factors may have contributed, such as a pandemic-driven loss of social programs and societal and policing changes after George Floyd’s murder. But one hypothesis is simpler, and perhaps has significant explanatory power: A massive increase in gun sales in early 2020 led to additional murders.

New data from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) suggest that that indeed may have been the case. According to the data, newly purchased weapons found their way into crimes much more quickly and often last year than in prior years. That seems to point to a definitive conclusion—that new guns led to more murders—but the data set cannot prove that just yet.

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Lara Smith of The Liberal Gun Club Discusses Rittenhouse Verdict

From Slate:

It’s always been complicated. Who’s the good guy with the gun? Was Rittenhouse a bad guy who became a good guy? Was he always a bad guy? Were there bad guys and good guys in the crowd who were armed? I think the answer is always complicated. But I think it’s different than a mass shooting. It’s different than somebody who goes to the crowd with the idea that I’m going to kill people. And I think that’s really important to keep in mind, especially for people on the left, that he didn’t go there to kill people, even though him being there was just the worst judgment in the world and stupid and he never should have been allowed to be there. And it’s a true failure of our society that no one said to a 17-year-old kid, “You don’t go do this because you might shoot somebody. Even if you don’t want to. You don’t go do this.”

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The ACLU Has Lost Its Way

From Reason:

More troubling is the response to the verdict from an organization that should know better: the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). In a statement reacting to the verdict, ACLU-Wisconsin Interim Executive Director Shaadie Ali lamented the “deep roots of white supremacy” in Kenosha that prevented Rittenhouse from being “held responsible for his actions.”

In a Twitter thread, the ACLU complained that Rittenhouse was not held accountable for his “conscious decision to travel across state lines and injure one person and take the lives of two people protesting the shooting of Jacob Blake by police.”

One might have expected that an organization dedicated to the preservation of civil liberties would not so cavalierly take the side of prosecutors against the concept of self-defense. In the past, the ACLU has done terrific work shining a light on prosecutorial misconduct—the tremendous power the state has to stack the deck against defendants. The ACLU purports to believe that all people, even the guilty, deserve due process protections. The organization is evidently outraged by the verdict: Is the ACLU outraged that the prosecutor tried to argue that Rittenhouse exercising his Miranda rights was evidence of his guilt?

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The Rittenhouse Verdict And The Gun Issue

From Cam and Company:

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Former NYT Employee Admits The Times Held Kenosha Riot Report Until After The Election

From Nellie Bowles:

When I was at the New York Times, I went to Kenosha to see about this, and it turned out to be not true. The part of Kenosha that people burned in the riots was the poor, multi-racial commercial district, full of small, underinsured cell phone shops and car lots. It was very sad to see and to hear from people who had suffered. Beyond the financial loss, small storefronts are quite meaningful to their owners and communities, which continuously baffles the Zoom-class.

Eventually the election passed. Biden was in the White House. And my Kenosha story ran. Whatever the reason for holding the piece, covering the suffering after the riots was not a priority. The reality that brought Kyle Rittenhouse into the streets was one we reporters were meant to ignore. The old man who tried to put out a blaze at a Kenosha store had his jaw broken. The top editor of the Philadelphia Inquirer had to resign in June 2020 amid staff outcry for publishing a piece with the headline, “Buildings Matter, Too.” 

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Rittenhouse Was The Militia In Action

From The Federalist:

Our executive vice president at Security Studies Group, Dr. Brad Patty, wrote about the history and utility of the militia last year. This part is particularly relevant to the many unsubstantiated claims about citizens taking action. Much more likely is when citizens come under attack by terrorists, insurrectionists, rioters, arsonists, or looters.

In that case, citizens are very likely to be the only force capable of responding in defense of the common peace and lawful order, at least for a short time. In the recent crisis, however, we have seen several occasions when the police vanished from afflicted areas of cities for a whole night or longer. Citizens who are left to themselves by a failure of state and local power have every right to defend the common peace and lawful order against those who would destroy it.

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Senator Cruz Calls Out Biden Nominee Rachel Rollins Who Refused To Prosecute Criminals

From Senator Cruz:

Senator Cruz’s Statement On Rachel Rollins:

Sen. Cruz pointed to her policy while serving as District Attorney for Suffolk County, where she declined to prosecute certain dangerous crimes and pushed for ‘reallocating’ police funding. He then urged his Democrat colleagues to consider the safety and security of their constituents and vote against this radical nominee. Read excerpts of his remarks in committee below.

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Portland Mayor Sued Over Murder Last Summer

From Ammoland:

The City of Portland, Oregon, its Mayor Ted Wheeler, and Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt are named as defendants in a $13 million federal lawsuit filed by the family of Aaron “Jay” Danielson, who was fatally shot on a downtown street Aug. 29, 2020, of last year by a self-proclaimed Antifa member during last summer’s unrest.

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CNN On The Changing Politics Of Guns

From CNN:

Several studies show most womenLGBTQ and Asian Americans, and an overwhelming majority of Black Americans, tend to vote for Democrats. Women and Black Americans were also the driving forces behind a 40% surge in first-time gun buyers through the first four months of 2020, according to the National Shooting Sports Foundation, a firearms trade group that tracks and analyzes gun sales across the country.NSSF spokesman Mark Oliva said his organization believes many of those first-time gun buyers are Democratic voters.

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Why Gun Control Is Doomed

From 19fortyfive:

Liberals across the country as well as Democratic lawmakers only see the negatives with the increase in firearm ownership. They see more guns used in violent acts, but the fact is that even as gun sales have hit record numbers – showing no signs of slowing down – that crime hasn’t kept pace. Moreover, in the past twenty years as crime has gone down, the number of guns in private hands has gone up.

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Smith & Wesson Sales Boom

From WBUR:

In the latest quarter, the company sold more than 600,000 guns and accessories — a quarter of a billion dollars worth of weapons. That represents a doubling of sales from a year ago, the company’s third consecutive record-breaking quarter.

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State Capitol Protests Turn Into Non Event

From The Federalist:

Americans have been gaslighted, again. After a horde of Trump supporters sacked the U.S. Capitol building over Congress certifying President-elect Joe Biden’s win in the Electoral College this month, Democrats and legacy media raised hysteria that the recent incursion was the first in what was supposed to become a series of domestic attacks targeting state capitols ahead of the inauguration.

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Are Gun Rights And Police Protestors On The Same Side?

From The Crime Report:

Protesters calling for stricter measures against police violence should be on the same side of the barricades as Second Amendment opponents of stricter gun controls, argues a Virginia law professor.

Since both fear the government’s ”monopoly of force” and are skeptical of authorities’ ability to protect citizens during times of unrest, they have an equal interest in Constitutional guarantees of the right to bear arms and protect themselves, Robert Leider writes in a forthcoming article in the Northwestern University Law Review.

Read the whole cited paper HERE.

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Delayed Rights Are Denied Rights

From Law and Liberty:

An analogy to the First Amendment demonstrates why the delays in gun access are unconstitutional. While the First Amendment permits states to require licenses for demonstrations (because of the need to prevent disruption to other activities), such licenses cannot be so unreasonably delayed as to effectively undermine the right of free speech. Moreover, the First Amendment suggests the need for licensing exceptions for demonstrations in response to breaking news. In any event, judges have permitted short delays of only a few days before licenses for demonstrations must be issued.

Similarly, licensing is permitted under the Second Amendment to make sure that guns do not get in the hands of felons and the mentally ill—categories of people the Supreme Court has stated do not have the right to guns. But delays in issuing gun licenses during unrest would render the Second Amendment right as ineffective as unnecessary delays in protest licensing would the First. Moreover, substantial delays are unneeded to determine whether someone is a felon or has been adjudicated as mentally ill, as the federal instant gun check program shows. These delays are also far more substantial than any “cooling off” period that would help prevent crimes of vengeance or passion, even assuming that such a reason for delay was compatible with the Second Amendment’s provision of a right to ready self-defense.

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