Posts Tagged ukraine

Ukraine Understands The Need For Armed Civilians

From The Gazette:

Zablotsky tells me Ukrainians are overwhelmingly in favor of the right of individuals to keep and bear arms. Ukrainians are now allowed to make private gun purchases. Territorial defense units were formed by local communities and were handed out arms by the military.

Zablotsky is steering a movement to procure guns for Ukrainian civilians to make his country a safer place. They believe that every Ukrainian owning a firearm, and trained how to use it, is the best form of protection from any foreign invasion.

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Ukrainian Politician Wants To Expand Gun Rights

From The Washington Times:

Months before the Russian invasion, Mr. Zablotskyy took on his country’s civilian gun-control system that was inherited from the former Soviet Union when he introduced a bill to allow private ownership of firearms.

“I tried to convince parliament. I was the sponsor of the bill that allowed the ownership of private firearms within Ukraine. Unfortunately, that bill has failed. And, largely, of course, due to the Russian lobby,” he told The Washington Times. “Now we, of course, understand why. I think that now there’s overwhelming support for the right of Ukrainians to bear arms.”

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Independence Is All Or Nothing

From National Review:

It is obvious that Russia’s attempt to dictate to Ukraine what alliances it may join and what kind of foreign relations it may pursue is a limit on Ukrainian sovereignty. But it is also a limit on American sovereignty, British sovereignty, German sovereignty, French sovereignty, and the sovereignty of every other NATO country. An alliance is a two-way relationship, and if Moscow has the power to foreclose it on one end, it has the power to foreclose it on the other end. We must not cede such power to Moscow.

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Ukraine Invasion Creates More Support For Gun Rights In US

From Cam and Company:

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The US Should Sell Weapons To Any Country For Defense

From The Federalist:

For the record, I have consistently warned against American interventions and nation-building for more than 30 years. I agree with John Quincy Adams that America “goes not abroad, in search of monsters to destroy. She is the well-wisher to the freedom and independence of all. She is the champion and vindicator only of her own.”

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James Yeager Volunteers For Ukraine Fight, Believes He Has ALS

From Warrior Poet Society:

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Firearms Industry Supporting Ukrainian Resistance

From Cam and Company:

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Armed Citizens For Personal And National Defense

From Cam and Company:

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The Real World Demonstration of Why Gun Rights Are Human Rights

From The Federalist:

The world is captivated by Ukraine’s resistance to Russian invasion, especially since much of Ukraine’s resistance comes from ordinary citizens taking up arms in defense of their homeland.

Ukraine has a fighting chance in part because it has taken dramatic steps to provide its people firearms. More than 25,000 automatic rifles and 10 million rounds of ammunition have been distributed to volunteers in Kyiv.

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Senator Obama Led Effort For Ukraine To Disarm

From Guns.com:

Elected in November 2004 to the seat held by U.S. Sen. Peter Fitzgerald, Obama’s banner freshman effort on Capitol Hill was to expand the Nunn – Lugar Cooperative Threat Reduction concept – a disarmament program that destroyed Ukraine’s 1,240 nuclear warheads – to include conventional weapons like artillery, small arms, and tanks. As part of the move, Obama traveled to Eastern Europe just eight months after taking office, accompanying U.S. Sen. Dick Lugar to meet with Ukrainian officials about destroying their guns with America picking up the tab. 

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Learning The Wrong Lesson. For Gun Haters, Gun Control Can Solve Anything.

From The Press Herald:

But how do we start a debate about global gun control to put pressure on someone like Putin to stop waging wars on innocent people?

….everyone everywhere should start talking about demilitarizing the world, or guns will undoubtedly kill many more millions in many more cities.

Gun control will not stop tyrants. What stops tyrants is a citizenry that is armed and trained in those arms. When every citizen is a possible combatant/insurgent that makes tyrants and despots think twice about controlling their own people or invading another people. To prevent more atrocities we need gun proliferation across the world. Everyone on this planet should know how to use a gun even if they don’t like them. Knowledge is power and knowing how to use a gun is even more powerful.

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Ukraine Is An Example Of Why Citizens Should Be Armed

From Bearing Arms:

It’s unlikely civilians in Ukraine will be able to use these new weapons effectively. Not immediately, anyway. If the war goes on long enough, some will learn and become effective. Possibly enough to repel the invasion entirely.

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AP Reporter Challenges State Dept Spokesman On Russia

From C-SPAN:

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Gaming a Russian Offensive

Gaming a Russian Offensive is republished with permission of Stratfor.”

Summary

Editor’s Note: As part of our analytical methodology, Stratfor periodically conducts internal military simulations. This series, examining the scenarios under which Russian and Western forces might come into direct conflict in Ukraine, reflects such an exercise. It thus differs from our regular analyses in several ways and is not intended as a forecast. This series reflects the results of meticulous examination of the military capabilities of both Russia and NATO and the constraints on those forces. It is intended as a means to measure the intersection of political intent and political will as constrained by actual military capability. This study is not a definitive exercise; instead it is a review of potential decision-making by military planners. We hope readers will gain from this series a better understanding of military options in the Ukraine crisis and how the realities surrounding use of force could evolve if efforts to implement a cease-fire fail and the crisis escalates.

Russia’s current military position in Ukraine is very exposed and has come at a great cost relative to its limited political gains. The strategic bastion of Crimea is defensible as an island but is subject to potential isolation. The position of Ukrainian separatists and their Russian backers in eastern Ukraine is essentially a large bulge that will require heavy military investment to secure, and it has not necessarily helped Moscow achieve its larger imperative of creating defensible borders. This raises the question of whether Russia will take further military action to secure its interests in Ukraine.

To answer this question, Stratfor examined six basic military options that Russia might consider in addressing its security concerns in Ukraine, ranging from small harassment operations to an all-out invasion of eastern Ukraine up to the Dnieper River. We then assessed the likely time and forces required to conduct these operations in order to determine the overall effort and costs required, and the Russian military’s ability to execute each operation. In order to get a baseline assessment for operations under current conditions, we initially assumed in looking at these scenarios that the only opponent would be Ukrainian forces already involved in the conflict.  Read the rest of this entry »

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Viewing Russia From the Inside

Viewing Russia From the Inside is republished with permission of Stratfor.”

By George Friedman

Last week I flew into Moscow, arriving at 4:30 p.m. on Dec. 8. It gets dark in Moscow around that time, and the sun doesn’t rise until about 10 a.m. at this time of the year — the so-called Black Days versus White Nights. For anyone used to life closer to the equator, this is unsettling. It is the first sign that you are not only in a foreign country, which I am used to, but also in a foreign environment. Yet as we drove toward downtown Moscow, well over an hour away, the traffic, the road work, were all commonplace. Moscow has three airports, and we flew into the farthest one from downtown, Domodedovo — the primary international airport. There is endless renovation going on in Moscow, and while it holds up traffic, it indicates that prosperity continues, at least in the capital. Read the rest of this entry »

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