Posts Tagged china

Official Resigns Over Pentagon’s Weak Cybersecurity Plans

From SOFREP:

But Chaillan quit on September 2. In his departing LinkedIn post, he cited the Pentagon’s reluctance to make cybersecurity and AI a priority as a reason for his resignation.

Speaking to the Financial Times in his first interview since leaving, Chaillan said China is streets ahead of the United States.

, , , ,

No Comments

Republic of China President Takes Bold Stance Against CCP

From The Federalist:

Taiwan will not bend the knee to an increasingly aggressive communist China, the country’s president says, warning that the defeat of the island nation would signal that “authoritarianism has the upper hand over democracy” in today’s “global contest of values.”

, , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

Whistleblower Claims CCP Intentionally Released Covid At Military Games

From The Daily Mail:

Ex-Chinese Communist Party insider Wei Jingsheng said The World Military Games in October 2019 could have acted as the virus’ first superspreader event.

The international tournament for military athletes was held in Wuhan – the origin of the Covid-19 pandemic – two months before China notified the World Health Organisation about its first cases.

Mr Jingsheng claimed it was no coincidence some of the 9,000 international athletes who gathered for the event reportedly became sick with a mystery illness.

, , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

CNN Uses China To Defend Gun Control

From CNN:

“When my friend told me about the shooting, I thought it was the United States,” one person wrote on the Chinese social media platform Weibo. Another user wrote, “Using a gun to kill people in China? Am I watching an American movie?”

That disbelief widely reflects how rare gun crime is in China — in contrast to it being a daily reality in the US.

The difference is stark when it comes to public safety. Despite being the world’s most populous country, with 1.4 billion residents, China only records a few dozen gun crimes a year. And more broadly, violent crime has continued falling, reaching its lowest level in 20 years in 2020, according to state-run news outlet Xinhua.

, , , , , , , ,

No Comments

Did Gen. Milley Commit Treason?

From The Federalist:

According to Woodward and Acosta, Milley even pledged to alert the Chinese in advance of an impending strike.

“General Li, you and I have known each other for now five years. If we’re going to attack, I’m going to call you ahead of time. It’s not going to be a surprise,” Milley allegedly said.

, , , , , ,

No Comments

How To Prepare and Train During Ammo Shortage

From The Federalist:

while a lot of ammunition is needed for serious practice over time, the most efficient way to improve one’s firearm skill—in terms of the time, money, and energy invested in relation to the return on that investment—is without ammunition, by what is commonly referred to as “dry firing,” the required safety precautions for which can be explained by any competent instructor.

According to former Army Special Forces soldier Mike Green, whose company, Green-Ops, conducts defensive firearm classes and dry-fire clinics in Northern Virginia and South-Central Texas, “dry-firing is the most often overlooked element of a comprehensive training program. But it shouldn’t be. It’s simple and almost cost-free.”

, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

The Politicians Continue To Play Checkers In Foreign Policy

From SOFREP:

Incredibly, Secretary of State Blinken said that Chinese influence in Afghanistan could be a positive thing if China sought a “peaceful resolution of the conflict,” and a “truly representative and inclusive” government. Yet, China doesn’t have a government that could be called “representative and inclusive” by anyone. So, why would they work towards one in Afghanistan?

Yet, it’s not unlikely that the Taliban held meetings with the Chinese intelligence service that could have aided in Taliban planning and operations.

Anyone who understands diplomacy and espionage can do the math and see that the Taliban are solidly backed by China. This could have emboldened them to take back Afghanistan in true blitzkrieg style as they did.

, , , , , , , ,

No Comments

The World After Afghanistan

From Spiked Online:

While a new regime in Afghanistan offers opportunities, this is still the Taliban we’re talking about. It is still a brutal Islamist movement, committed to the rule of Sharia law. And, insofar as it backs and inspires other Islamists, the Taliban still poses a significant security threat to all those regional powers hoping to take advantage of its retaking of power.

, , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

The Chinese Are Testing Biden

From The Federalist:

Chinese military aircraft entered Taiwan’s Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ) on two separate occasions Thursday, marking the second consecutive day of provocation by the Chinese military. The move from Beijing follows the deployment of an electronic intelligence aircraft to the region on Wednesday.

, , , , , , , ,

No Comments

The China/Taiwan Problem

From War on the Rocks:

Changing circumstances merit fresh thinking about how to ensure peace between China and Taiwan going forward, but a decades-old policy framework restrains American flexibility in reacting to those changes. The result is a Taiwan Strait that edges ever closer to crisis while Washington tinkers with policies that may no longer be sufficient to avert catastrophe.

, , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

US Increases Arms Sales To Republic of China (Taiwan)

From The Federalist:

“If concluded, this proposed sale will contribute to the modernization of Taiwan’s howitzer fleet, strengthening its self-defense capabilities to meet current and future threats,” a State Department official told CNN.

Taiwan’s foreign ministry welcomed the deal, saying the proposed sale would help the island nation “maintain a rock-solid self-defense” and “regional peace and stability.”

, , , , , , , ,

No Comments

The Death Of Hong Kong

From Bari Weiss:

By my lights, the most important news event of this past week was not the New York mayoral primary (my condolences to Andrew Yang). It wasn’t Bitcoin dropping below $30,000. And it certainly wasn’t the new bipartisan infrastructure deal announced by President Biden.

It was the forced closure of Apple Daily, a pro-democracy newspaper in Hong Kong.

You may not have heard of Apple Daily. I knew of it, but only vaguely. It is — or rather, it was — Hong Kong’s version of the New York Post combined with William Lloyd Garrison’s The Liberator. A tabloid, yes. But also: a voice for freedom. 

, , , , , ,

No Comments

Chinese Communists Have Infiltrated Western Companies and Governments

From The Federalist:

Based on this database, The Australian also disclosed the names of several companies that have employed CCP members, including Boeing, Volkswagen, Qualcomm, Pfizer, AstraZeneca, Deutsche Bank, and J.P. Morgan. Further, as seen via the database, numerous CCP members have infiltrated Australian, American, and United Kingdom consulates in Shanghai, China.

, , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

Marines Train In Taiwan For First Time In 40 Years

From Taiwan News:

Taiwan’s Naval Command on Monday (Nov. 9) confirmed media reports that a contingent of U.S. Marines have arrived at the invitation of Taiwan’s military and will begin training Taiwanese troops for four weeks starting that day, marking the first public acknowledgment of U.S. Marines training in Taiwan in over 40 years.

, , , , , , ,

No Comments

Silicon Valley and China

From Foreign Policy:

In the U.S. system, laws are legitimate insofar as they are conceived by what Jean-Jacques Rousseau called “the general will” of the people, expressed through the workings of a democratic political system. Laws that are arbitrary or imposed by the will of a single person of authority are illegitimate. Yet the Chinese system rests on the idea that the sole source of legitimacy is the CCP, which represents—it claims—the will of the Chinese nation in its entirety and violently suppresses challenges to its authority. This sharp tension between the political value systems that prevail in the two countries is a primary cause of the spiraling bilateral competition. Tech companies confront this tension when they are tasked to comply with Chinese laws, by enabling the arrest of dissidents for “subversion of state power” or the mass surveillance of Uighurs, which are rightly viewed by most Americans as immoral and illegitimate.

, , , , , , , , ,

No Comments